Tag Archives: mutation

Mutants can be beautiful!

 

Both these roses come from the same bush in my garden at home. The one on the left is how the rose normally looks, year after year. This year, on a single branch sprouting to the side, there are about six flowers that look striped, like the one on the right. This article, from the American Rose Society, describes how a genetic mutation can cause this change in pigments.

Stripes may also result from spontaneous or induced mutations. Mutations are sudden changes that occur at a very low frequency in a gene. Spontaneous mutations (popularly known as ‘sports’) alter the existing genes and their expression, resulting in stripes. Induced mutations by irradiation or chemical mutagens also lead to genetically-altered  pigmentation, and the result is stripes. Stripes may develop as a result of the transmission of genes responsible for stripes through hybridization. Viral infection that causes variegation in tulips may also cause stripes in roses. These infections could interfere with physiological functions of pigmentation, giving them a striped appearance.

It is possible that a mutation has occurred during mitosis somewhere at the base of the new branch and all the cells in the new branch carry the mutated gene, which is expressed as a striped phenotype. If this is the case, a cutting from this branch will also produce striped flowers. So, I will take a cutting and propagate this rose, to see if we can produce more of these beautiful mutants!